Fall 2014
Winter 2015
Spring 2014
Summer 2014

Winter 2015

The course list for Winter 2014 is available as a pdf file.

Fall 2014

Click on a department name to display the course offerings.
Click on the course name to register.
B A 545 Global Business Forum (1)
Discussion of current trends in the global business environment and of international issues facing companies. Leaders from international businesses and other organizations, as well as faculty members from various departments and specializations, invited to share their perspectives with seminar participants. Topics change each quarter. Contact mbaregis@uw.edu for course availability and entry codes.

Section A

TBA
M 1230-1120
PCAR 390
Section C
TBA
M 500-550
PCAR 395
COM 322 Global Communication (5)
Introduction to the history, purpose, channels, content, technologies, policy, and regulation of international communications systems. Issues covered include disparities in media development between post-industrial and developing nations, imbalances in international news and information flow, and the emergence of global communications. Offered jointly with POL S 329.

TBA
TTh 1130-120
BAG 154
CHID 498 Russian Food (5)
A special topic in the literary and cultural history of Russia.
Alaniz, Jose
TTh 930-1120
TBA
CHID 498 Disability in Russian Culture (Topics – Russian Lit., Cult. & Hist.) (5)
What is “disability”? What is “health”? What is “normal”? What is a “body”? The course will first examine how these questions have historically been answered in American culture. We will discuss and critique Disability Theory, the Disability Rights Movement and the representation of the disabled. Armed with these “Western” concepts and insights, we then turn our attention to Russia and its cultural productions involving disability (i.e., works about the disabled or made by disabled artists), focusing on 19th and 20th century literature/art. Among our topics: the grotesque, the “holy
fool”, the “cult of suffering.” What role have paganism, Orthodox Christianity, nationalism, communism and World War II played in Russia’s answers to our initial questions? We conclude with a consideration of the disabled in late/post-Soviet Russia – a (still-ongoing) historical moment in which discourses of disability have reached unprecedented levels – and ponder the future of disability rights in Russia. In addition to a course packet and at least three films, we will read
the following: Omon Ra by Victor Pelevin, Skunk by Pyotr Aleshkovsky and School for Fools by Sasha Sokolov. Note to majors: this course is intended as an introductory course.

Alaniz, Jose
TTh 230-420
MEB 237
C LIT 230 Introduction to Folklore Studies (5)
Folklore (stories, songs, beliefs, customs, folk craft and folk art) is a window into a group’s worldview. This course will survey the different genres of folklore and kinds of groups which maintain folklore traditions. A variety of theories and methods applied in folklore studies during the past two centuries will be introduced in readings and lectures.  Comprehensive overview of the field of folkloristics, focusing on verbal genres, customs, belief, and material culture. Particular attention to the issues of community, identity, and ethnicity. Offered jointly with SCAND 230.

Smidchens, Guntis
MTWThF 1230-120
SAV 260

C LIT 397 B Cinema of Roman Polanski (5)
From the early experimental films of the 1950s that are still being studied in film schools all over the world, such as a famous Two Men and a Wardrobe (1958)–which Roman Polanski directed as a second-year-student–to the 2002 The Pianist, a winner of the Academy Award for the Best Director, the films of Roman Polanski have attracted a world-wide audience and made Polanski himself one of the most well known and best regarded contemporary directors. This course will explore Polanski’s remarkable and cosmopolitan oevre which by now spans more than four decades. We
will focus on Polanski’s most successful films, starting with his experimental Polish shorts, proceeding onto his highly acclaimed English productions such as Repulsion and The Fearless Vampire Killers, his Hollywood classics like Rosemary’s Baby and Chinatown, his post-Hollywood multi-national productions which include films such as The Tenant and Frantic, his 1990s Bitter Moon and Death and the Maiden, and his last films-to-date, The Pianist and Oliver Twist. The course will look into how Polanski’s movies adopt a number of different genres and different aesthetic approaches to deal with some of Polanski’s recurrent themes, such as solitude, victimization, the separation from the society, and the idiosyncratic worldview of an isolated individual. Offered jointly with SLAV 223 A.

Crnkovic, Gordana
TTh 230-420
MUE 153

C LIT 497 Disability in Russian Culture (Topics – Russian Lit., Cult. & Hist.) (5)
Offered jointly with CHID 498 D. Please see CHID 498 D for course description.

Alaniz, Jose
TTh 230-420
MEB 237

C LIT 497 A – Disability in Russian Cimena (5)
Please contact the instructor for course information.

Alaniz, Jose
MW 930-1120
DEN 206
ECON 435 Natural Resource Economics (5)
Survey of the economics of renewable and nonrenewable resources including fisheries, forest, minerals, and fuels. Optimal trade-offs between benefits and costs of resource use, including trade-offs between current and future use. Effects of property rights on resource use. Prerequisite: ECON 300. Go to www.econ.washington.edu/instruction/courses/overloadpolicies.htm. for add code info.

Ellis, Gregory
TTh 830-1020
CDH 110A

ECON 471 International Trade (5)
This is an intermediate course in the theory of international trade. Using the tools of microeconomic analysis, we study the basis and pattern of trade as well as the welfare and distributional impacts of free trade among various groups in the economy. We also study the reasons for limiting trade and discuss some of the current trade policy issues. Systematic study of the material in this course helps students develop the mental skills necessary to gain insight into the workings of an open economy as well as the state of past and current international economic order. Prerequisite: 2.0 in 301. Go to www.econ.washington.edu/instruction/courses/overloadpolicies.htm. for add code info.

Wong, Kar-Yiu
TTh 1030-1220
SMI 105

ECON 472 International Macroeconomics (5)
International monetary theory and open economy macroeconomics. Balance of payments and foreign exchange markets. Different exchange rate arrangements and their adjustment mechanisms. Money and international capital movements. Policy issues. The international monetary system. Prerequisite: 2.0 in ECON 301. Go to www.econ.washington.edu/instruction/courses/overloadpolicies.htm. for add code info.

Turnovsky, Michelle
TTh 1030-1220
PAR 108
Chen, Yu-Chin
MW 330-520
PCAR 295

ECON 495 Economies in Transition (5)
This course is about the links between institutional choice and economic growth, bringing together economic history and economic theory. In a historical overview, we review the classic models of the dynamic process of growth. The historical overview investigates how institutional choices in the command economies of the former Soviet Union and China influenced capital formation, human capital, productivity, and the role of technology in socialist growth strategy. Then, we turn to institutional change and economic performance in countries that undertook rapid institutional and structural change. Early Chinese reform involved the replacement of the Chinese communes with a household responsibility system, a substantial opening to the world market, in part through the establishment of special economic zones, and the rise of town-and-village enterprises that increased the forces of competition. But China’s gradual transition included retention of bureaucratic state-owned firms and a household registration system (hukuo) that created a gulf between urban and rural populations. Nevertheless, with rapid growth, millions of Chinese households moved out of poverty. In Eastern Europe and the Former Soviet Union, the rise and decline of Communism was the defining event of the Twentieth Century.

Thornton, Judith
TTh 1030-1220
TBA

ECON 535 Natural Resource Economics (3)
Half of integrated two-course sequence in environmental and natural resource economics. Dynamic optimization. Nonrenewable resource extraction and exploration, including effects of market structure, uncertainty, and taxation. Renewable resources, including fisheries and forests. Prerequisite: ECON 500; ECON 501, or permission of instructor.

Halvorsen, Robert
TTh 130-250
SAV 167
MUSIC 316 Music Cultures of the World (5)
Music 316 explores the relationship of music to peoples’ ways of life in the various regions and cultures of Asia. People construct the world around them into diverse cultural patterns and systems; and music is always an important element in such constructions. Music may be many different things to different peoples and cultures — ranging from something as abstract or ideal as an expressive “art” or a medium of religious worship, to something as practical as an item in the
technological toolkit for hunting game, curing sickness, or storing and communicating information. Music frequently plays an important role in kinship, economic, political, and legal systems. And music, like the rest of culture, is always changing and developing new forms. We will hear some of the most unusual and beautiful of these forms as we consider the dynamics and significance of music in cultures ranging from small nomadic camps to immense civilizations, spread across the world’s largest continent.

Ellingson, Ter
MTWF 1030-1120
MUS 126
JSIS A 494 B European Union Simulation (5)
This course, sponsored by the European Union Center of Excellence, is a practicum focused on the current, real-world policy issues and internal diplomacy of the European Union. We will look at the roles of large and small countries in policy formation, negotiation, and how countries and other stakeholders work to ensure that final policy outcomes reflect their preferences and concerns. The course begins with background and theoretical information on the European Union, policy-making, and diplomacy, and ends with a series of simulated European Union Summit meetings, where
teams of students will represent EU countries in an extended negotiation over a series of policy issues. LaRue is a former US Foreign Service Officer and International Manager for Amazon.com. Offered jointly with POL S 447. Strongly recommended: POL S 204.

TBA
MW 1230-220
THO 325
GEOG 375 Geopolitics (5)
An introduction to both political geography and geopolitics, addressing the fundamental links between power and space. Topics covered include: theories of power, space, and modernity; the formation of modern states; international geopolitics in the aftermath of the Cold War; the post-colonial nation-state; and the geopolitics of resistance. Offered jointly with JSIS B 375.
TBA
MW 130-320
CDH 110A
HSTAM 370 Vikings (5)
The Vikings at home in Scandinavia and abroad, with particular emphasis on their activities as revealed in archaeological finds and in historical and literary sources. This is a lecture/discussion course which looks at the history of Scandinavia and its people in the “viking age” (approx. AD 750-AD 1100). Through the use of the literary and archeological record, we examine the culture and society out of which the Viking raiders arose, their impact and influence on contemporary medieval Europe and their enduring legacy. Offered jointly with SCAND 370.
Leiren, Terje
MTWTh130-220
SIG 134

 

HSTCMP 440 History of Communism (5)
This course will explore several themes pertaining to the history of communism. We will compare the theory of communism, as espoused in canonical texts from Marx, Lenin and others, to attempts at its implementation in the Soviet Union, China, Latin America and elsewhere. This course will also examine the factors behind the rise and fall of Communist regimes, searching for explanations for why communism took root not in the industrially developed countries of Western Europe, as Marx had predicted, but in less industrialized, largely agricultural societies, such as Tsarist Russia and China. We will read a variety of primary sources and memoirs that describe how individuals experienced Communist societies. Finally, we will try to put all these facets together in order to explain why communism failed in Eastern Europe, yet managed to survive and even adapt elsewhere. Offered jointly with JSIS B 440 A.

Young, Glennys
MW 1030-1150
SIG 224
HSTEU 303 Contemporary European History Since 1815 (5)
This course will cover key events, themes, and ideas in European history from 1815 to the present. These include: nationalism and the nation-state, industrialization and class struggle, democratization and liberalism, political and social radicalism, revolutions and protests, colonialism and internationalism, the formation and deconstruction of class/nation/race/gender, World War I, the Russian Revolution, Fascism and Nazism, World War II and its aftermath, decolonization, Europe in the Cold War, the revolutions of 1989, and the emergence of the European Union. We will pay special attention to ongoing questions of European history: who is European? How have Europeans thought about themselves and their communities (national, ethnic, global)? How has Europe related to those ‘outside’ Europe? How have Europeans sought to reshape their communities, their political and social systems, and their world as a whole?

Jonas, Raymond
MW 930-1120 plus F quiz section
FSH 107
HSTEU 380 History of Scandinavia to 1720 (5)
This course provides a historical overview of Scandinavia from the end of the Viking Age to the period of the Enlightenment (approx. AD 1050 – AD 1720). The course examines major political, social, and economic developments in Denmark, Norway, Sweden, Iceland, and Finland from the Christian Middle Ages through the Lutheran Reformation. Among other topics, this course looks at the rise of the development of the Scandinavian nation states, Scandinavia’s relations with Europe, the Lutheran Reformation, Sweden’s growth to a Great Power, and Scandinavian experiments in
absolutist government.

Leiren, Terje
MTWTh 1030-1120
TBA
HSTEU 444 Imperial Russia:1700-1900 (5)
Development of Russia from Peter the Great to Nicholas II. This course provides an overview of Russian Imperial History from the late 17th century to the Revolutions of 1917. What were the cohesive forces that held the Empire together and the tensions within the system that led to its collapse? We will explore the Russian Imperial past through examining the nature and evolution of autocratic power, politics of reform and revolution, imperial ideologies and practices, social structure and everyday experiences, as well as intellectual and cultural life. Offered jointly with JSIS A
444.
Campbell, Elena
MW 1130-120
RAI 121
HSTEU 490 A Polish Culture (5)
Overview of contemporary Polish culture: literature (prose, poetry, and drama), film (feature, documentary, and video art), music (classical, jazz, and rock), theatre, art, and architecture, as well as an introduction to the cultural life in Poland in the twenty-first century.

TBA
MW 230-420
JHN 175
HSTEU 513 Europe and the Modern World I (5)
Europe and its global engagements in the modern period. This course provides an acquaintance with some of the great themes, problems, and events in the history of modern Europe including, but not limited to, Europe’s larger global engagements. It offers a foundation for advanced study of a thematic or regional nature, a basis for comparative historical study within Europe and beyond, and preparation for the teaching of entry-level and advanced undergraduate surveys. ADD CODES: SMI 206C

Jonas, Raymond
W 130-320
SAV 169
HSTRY 498 Colloquium in History: The Bloodlands: East Central Europe under Hitler and Stalin (5)
Between 1933 and 1945, the regimes of Nazi Germany and the Soviet Union murdered 14 million people, not counting soldiers killed in battle, in the area between central Poland and western Russia. These include the millions starved to death in the famine in the Soviet Ukraine, the hundreds of thousands killed during Stalin’s Great Terror or shot during the Soviet-Nazi joint occupation of Poland, the millions of Jews who perished in the Holocaust and millions of Soviet
citizens starved to death by the Nazis during World War II. In this course, students will read and discuss Timothy Snyder’s new book, “Bloodlands: Europe between Hitler and Stalin,” and choose an aspect of these grim events to investigate in a 15 to 20 page research paper.

Felak, James
Th 930-1120
SMI 306
JSIS A 110 Introduction to Russian Culture and Civilization (5)
Introduction to Russian culture and history from pre-Christian times to the present, as seen through literary texts, music, film, visual art, and historical works. All lectures and written materials in English. No prior knowledge of Russian necessary. Offered jointly with RUSS 110 A.

Henry, Barbara
MTWTh 1230-120
PCAR 290

JSIS A 110 B Courtship, Marriage, Divorce (5)
Offered jointly with RUSS 120. Please see RUSS 120 for course description.

Diment, Galya
MW 230-420
SIG 225

JSIS A 210 Introduction to Islamic Civilization (5)
Major developments in Islamic civilization from advent of Islam in seventh century to present. Islamic history, law, theology, and mysticism, as well as the politics, cultures, and literatures of the various Islamic societies. Offered jointly with NEAR E 210.

TBA
TTh 130-320 plus M quiz section
KNE 210

JSIS A 301 Europe Today (5)
A multi-disciplinary approach to contemporary Europe focusing on social, political, cultural, and economic change, with special reference to developments in the countries of the European Union, Scandinavia, and those in Eastern Europe in the post-Soviet era. This course will introduce students to the political, social and cultural challenges that Europe faces today. We will explore aspects of history, politics, social life and the humanities in order to grasp the exciting dynamics of this continent on its integration path. Relying on the expertise of University of Washington faculty from several disciplines, the course also wants to introduce different methods and approaches to studying Europe to you. Weekly guest lectures by invited faculty therefore are a core part of Euro 301. Moreover, with this multidisciplinary approach we would like to invite specialization in European Studies and encourage students to develop research topics for their senior thesis.

Lang, Sabine
TTh 1130-1250
THO 101

JSIS A 379 Turkic Peoples of Central Asia (3)
History of the Turkic peoples, AD 552 to present. Emphasis on current status of Turkic peoples in Central Asia. Geographical distribution, demographic data, reactions and adaptations to changes resulting from the 1917 revolution. Turkic viewpoint on past and present developments. Offered jointly with NEAR E 375 and NEAR E 596 A.

Cirtautas, Ilse
MW 130-250
THO 335

JSIS A 444 Imperial Russia:1700-1900 (5)
See HSTEU 444 for course description. Offered jointly with HSTEU 444.

Campbell, Elena
MW 1130-120
RAI 121

JSIS A 445 20th Century Russia: The Rise and Fall of the Soviet Union (5)
In 1917, the world’s first experiment in creating a socialist society was launched in Russia. Seventy-four years later, in 1991, Soviet Communism collapsed. Although relatively short-lived, the Soviet experiment was the great utopian project of the twentieth century. Its significance, therefore, transcended Soviet borders. Its meaning was debated around the globe. For some, it was humankind’s ultimate hope; for others, its “totalitarian terror” was among humanity’s darkest
nightmares. Now that the history of the Soviet Union is behind us, and we have access to more sources that once were secret, we can assess as never before the meaning of the Soviet socialist project. Indeed, we need to do so, for the challenges that the Soviet socialist project entailed, whether creating the just society, overcoming economic backwardness, or using politics to transform society and culture, are some of the challenges (and dilemmas) that face the world today.

Young, Glennys
MTWThF 1030-1120
TBA

JSIS A 494 Gender and Citizenship in the Global North (5)
Citizenship in Europe and in the United States is gendered. Gender arrangements are a key dimension of political participation, economic performance, civic engagement, and family structures. Persisting gender inequalities on both continents are a challenge that governments, businesses, and families address in different ways and with different priorities. Investigating gendered citizenship means assessing, among other things, the distribution of economic and political resources, of public voice, and of care work in Europe and the US. This course introduces students to multiple
approaches to gender equality, ranging from the liberal citizenship discourse and its policies in the United States to social democratic citizenship in Scandinavia and republican citizenship in France. We will assess persisting inequalities and measures that different states have taken to counteract them. Moreover, we will ask how the EU has influenced gender policies in its member states and whether Central and East European Countries have adjusted to Western gender norms after 1989. Offered jointly with POL S 447 B.

Lang, Sabine
MW 130-250
THO 202

JSIS A 504 Bibliography and Research Methods (5)
This course provides a basic intellectual foundation for indisciplinary graduate-level study of Russia, East Europe and Central Asia. Students read important texts and are introduced to major debates on the history, politics, and culture of the region. Instruction is provided by REECAS faculty members from the major scholarly disciplines. Topics covered include the nature of Stalinism, the sources and consequences of ethnic conflict and nationalism, postcommunist democracy and authoritarianism, and the challenges of current-day globalization.

Radnitz, Scott
W 330-620
THO 215

JSIS A 512 REECAS Certificate Capstone (1)
Independent Study/Research. Includes the preparation and presentation of the student portfolio required for the Russian, Eastern European, and Central Asian Studies certificate. Contact Marta Mikkelsen at martam@uw.edu for add codes.

Burnet, Marta
TBA
TBA

JSIS B 375 Geopolitics (5)
See GEOG 375 for course description. Offered jointly with Geography.

TBA
MW 130-320
CDH 110A

JSIS B 429 International Nuclear Nonproliferation
See GEOG 375 for course description. Offered jointly with Geography.

TBA
ThF 130-320
SMI 107

JSIS B 440 A History of Communism (5)
See HSTCMP 440 for course description. Offered jointly with History.

Young, Glennys
MW 1030-1150
SIG 224

JSIS B 529 International Nuclear Nonproliferation
Offered jointly with JSIS B 429. Please see JSIS B 429 for course description.

TBA
ThF 130-320
SMI 107

JSIS D 445 Politics and Society in Eastern Europe (5)
This course presents an overview of the politics, cultures and societies of Central and Eastern Europe. With the end of the Cold War, post-communist countries have evolved in different directions with some successfully joining NATO and the European Union while others struggle to consolidate democracy in the context of viable state structures. Increasingly it appears that new regional configurations capture these diverse outcomes better than the simple East versus West European divide of the post WWII era. Roughly speaking, there is now a Northern Baltic Europe (Scandinavian countries + the Baltic Republics), an East Central Europe (Poland, Hungary, Czech Republic, Slovakia and possibly Slovenia + Croatia), a Southeastern or Balkan Europe (Bulgaria, Romania, Bosnia, Serbia, Macedonia, Montenegro + Albania), an Eastern Europe (Moldova, Ukraine, Russia, Belarus) and a Southern Caucasus Europe (Armenia + Georgia) — which taken together comprise a complex mosaic of distinct but also somewhat fluid and interdependent regions. All of these countries can be considered east European and all were once communist but with divergent historical legacies, socio-economic levels of development, and political trajectories they can no longer all be subsumed under a catch all label like “Eastern Europe”. With that in mind, this course will begin with a theoretical overview of how to account for divergent outcomes in post-communist eastern Europe (2 weeks). We will then focus on key regions (2 weeks each): East Central Europe (with a focus on Poland + the Czech Republic); Eastern Europe (with a focus on Ukraine and Moldova); Balkan Europe (with a focus on Bulgaria and Bosnia). We will complete the course by taking an in- depth look at developments in Russia (2 weeks). Offered jointly with POL S 445 A.

Cirtautas, Arista
TTh 330-520
SMI 407
LSJ 320 Politics & Law of International Human Rights (5)
This course examines the emergence and development, since World War II, of an international movement dedicated to the promotion of human rights. We will study the goals of the movement and the global political context in which it operates. Special attention will be given to the legal institutions, national and international, which have influenced its evolution and character. Students taking the course will acquire an enhanced understanding of the role in human rights politics played by the United Nations, national governments, non-governmental organizations, international customary law, treaty law, regional courts, and international tribunals. Students will also be responsible for writing a research paper on some aspect of human rights. Studies the international human rights movement in its legal and political context. Focuses on institutions which influence, enable, and constrain the international promotion of human rights. Offered jointly with POL S 368.

TBA
MWF 1030-1120 plus TTh quiz section
BAG 131
SMEA 507 A International Organizations & Ocean Management (3)
Survey of the manner in which international regimes and organizations attempt to manage and regulate the uses of the ocean. Primary emphasis is on the analysis of the effectiveness of regimes and of processes that support or constrain these organizations. Prerequisite: SMA 500 or permission of instructor. Offered jointly with PB AF 538. *** WAITLIST: EVANSREG@UW.EDU ***

TBA
MW 1030-1150
FSH 108
NEAR E 210 Introduction to Islamic Civilization (5)
See JSIS A 210 for course description. Offered jointly with International Studies.
TBA
TTh 130-320 plus M quiz section
KNE 210

NEAR E 375 Turkic Peoples of Central Asia (3)
See JSIS A 379 for course description. Offered jointly with International Studies.

Cirtautas, Ilse
MW 130-250
THO 335

<ahref=”http://www.washington.edu/students/timeschd/AUT2014/neareast.html#neare496″ target=”_blank”>NEAR E 496 C The Middle East and Central Asia (5)
This course is an introduction to Comparative Muslim Societies in the Middle East and Central Asia from anthropological perspectives. It is an ethnographic survey course which examines the unity and diversity of Muslim communities in different locations. This course aims to acquaint students with the significant linguistic, cultural and political diversity of Muslim societies and help them develop an understanding of Islam as lived experience with a focus on the everyday lives of Muslims in these societies. We will focus on how Islam informs culture and creates social and spiritual meaning for individual Muslims and Muslim communities. We will identify and examine some of the shared “fundamentals” of the religion; the Muslims’ understanding of their faith; the relationship of Islam to the political, economic and social lives of individual Muslims and how Islam shapes people’s sense of identity. No prior knowledge of or exposure to Islam on the part of students is presumed. However, some background in the Middle East and Central Asian Muslim world would be helpful, but not essential. The course will consist of lectures, reading assignments, and class discussions. In addition, it will make extensive use of films and other visual media materials. Offered jointly with NEAR E 596 D.

Mawkanuli, Talant
TTh 130-320
SAV 131

NEAR E 518 Foreign Language Teaching Methodology (2)
Current foreign language teaching methods and approaches. Learning and teaching strategies and techniques for the four skills (reading, writing, speaking, listening) including cultural notions. Current and future trends in pedagogy and technology. Offereed jointly with SCAND 518 and SLAV 518.

Brandl, Klaus
Th 130-320
DEN 316

NEAR E 524 Islamic Law (3)
Selected topics in Islamic law that highlight major aspects of Islamic civilization. Offered: jointly with LAW B 556.

Lombardi, Clark
TTh 830-1020
LAW L201

NEAR E 596 Turkic Peoples of Central Asia (3)
See JSIS A 379 for course description. Offered jointly with International Studies.

Cirtautas, Ilse
MW 130-250
THO 335

NEAR E 596 B. The Middle East and Central Asia (5)
Offered jointly with NEAR E 496 C. See NEAR E 496 C for course description.

Mawkanuli, Talant
TTh 130-320
SAV 131

TKISH 451 Readings in Turkish Literary History I: Modern (3)
The development of modern Turkish literature and its ties to, and divergence from, the Ottoman tradition. Readings in modern and Tanzimat poetry, short story, drama, and novel.

Kuru, Selim
MW 300-420
SAV 156

TKISH 600 Independent Study or Research (1-10)

TBA
TBA
TBA
POL S 203 Introduction to International Relations (5)
This course introduces students to the major theoretical approaches to international relations “Realism, Liberalism, and Marxism” and uses these approaches to address a variety of issues. For example, we will discuss the rise of the modern state system, the origins of WWI, the Cold War, the Gulf Wars, genocide in Rwanda, free trade, globalization, North-South relations, the environment, and human rights. Primary course objectives are to demonstrate how theory influences our explanations; to familiarize students with some important issues in international politics; and most important, to help students evaluate contemporary issues in international politics.

TBA
MWF 930-1020, plus TTh quiz section
PCAR 192

POL S 204 Introduction to Comparative Politics (5)
In this course we will explore recent and historical trends in the political and economic development of seven countries in four world regions, paying particular attention to differences and similarities between these countries that might explain when and why countries democratize, or when and how countries enhance their economic productivity. In doing so, we will address both major substantive issues as well as important theoretical debates that have informed the study of comparative politics over the last several decades. Why have some countries become stable democracies while others have become authoritarian or even totalitarian regimes? Why are poverty and inequality such pervasive problems in some areas that were former European colonies, while in other areas developing countries have made great strides toward alleviating these problems? Does economic globalization improve or hinder the prospects for economic development and democratization around the globe? Upon finishing this course, students will be in a position to formulate answers to these questions and enter some of the central debates that motivates the study of comparative politics.

TBA
MWF 1230-120, plus TTh quiz section
PCAR 192

POL S 329 Global Communication (5)
See COM 322 for course description. Offered jointly with Communications.

TBA
TTh 1130-120
BAG 154

POL S 368 Politics & Law of International Human Rights (5)
See LSJ 320 for course description. Offered jointly with Law, Society & Justice.

TBA
MWF 1030-1120 plus TTh quiz section
BAG 131

POL S 407 International Conflict (5)
Examines different theoretical explanations for the causes of war, including the role of international, state, organizational, and individual factors; additional topics vary with instructor. May include the development of warefare, deterring weapons of mass destruction, terrorism, intelligence, and the ethics of warfare. War is a central feature of international politics. The course begins with an overview of the development of modern warfare, but it focuses on the causes of war. Is war inevitable given the structure of the international system, or can, for example, changes in beliefs or the spread of democracies temper aggressive appetites or eliminate the security dilemma? We will examine these questions by focusing on World War I, World War II , the Persian Gulf War, and the war in Iraq. The course concludes with a discussion of the ethics of war.

TBA
TTh 1000-1120 plus WF quiz section
THO 101

POL S 445 A Politics and Society in Easter Europe (5)
Offered jointly with JSIS D 445. Please see JSIS D 445 for course description.

Cirtautas, Arista
TTh 330-520
SMI 407

POL S 447 A European Union Simulation (5)
See JSIS A 494 B for course description. Offered jointly with International Studies.

TBA
MW 1230-220
THO 325

POL S 447 B Gender and Citizenship in the Global North (5)
Offerend jointly with JSIS A 494. Please see JSIS A 494 for course description.

Lang, Sabine
MW 130-250
THO 202

POL S 448 Politics of the European Union (5)
In this course, students will learn about the European Union in two aspects: the EU as a process of international or regional integration and the EU as a polity or political system with its own institutions, policies, and policy processes. The study of the European Union borders between international relations and comparative politics, and the course draws from both fields of political science. The course is arranged in four parts: (1) the political history of European integration in the post-war era, and the theories on why integration occurs; (2) the political system of the EU, including its core institutions and its legislative, executive and judicial politics; (3) core EU policies, including the European internal market, the single currency, and social policy; and (4) the key challenges facing the EU in the coming years, including enlargement, “Europeanization” of domestic politics, European social identity, a “Constitution” for Europe, and the “democratic deficit.”

TBA
TTh 930-1120
SIG 225

POL S 519 Modern Scandinavian Politics (5)
Analyzes the political, economic, and historical development of Sweden, Norway, Denmark, Iceland, and Finland from World War II to the present. Readings focus on domestic and foreign policies that distinguish these countries from other advanced industrial societies.

Ingebritsen, Christine
TTh 1230-220
SAV 158

POL S 521 International Relations Core (5)
Key theories, concepts, and debates in the study of world politics and international relations. Provides an overview of the field and prepares students for the IR comprehensive exam.

TBA
M 130-420
SMI 109
PB AF 507 Mediation & Negotiation in Public Management & Policy-Making (3)
Possibilities offered by mediation and negotiation methods using a mixture of cases, readings, discussions, lectures, and guest speakers. Use of negotiation and mediation techniques to resolve disputes and disagreements over publicpolicy issues. No Freshmen, Sophomores, Juniors, or Seniors. PB AF, PB AFE majors only (Period 1). If class is full, email evansreg@u.washington.edu for wait list.

Reid, Jim
T 530-820
PAR 108

PB AF 538 International Organizations & Ocean Management (3)
See SMEA 507 A for course description. Offered jointly with Marine Affairs.

TBA
MW 1030-1150
FSH 108
LITH 490 Supervised Reading in Lithuanian (1-10)
Readings in a selected area of Lithuanian language, culture, or society.
TBA
TBA
TBA

SCAND 230 Introduction to Folklore Studies (5)
See C LIT 230 for course description. Offered jointly with Comparative Literature 230.

Smidchens, Guntis
MTWThF 1230-120
SAV 260

SCAND 340 Kalevala and the Epic Tradition (5)
An interdisciplinary approach to the Finnish national epic Kalevala, Estonian Kalevipoeg, and Saami Peivebarnen suongah jehtanasan maajisn. Discussion of traditional worldview, cultural revitalization, and emergent nationalism in nineteenth- and twentieth-century Finland, Estonia, and Saamiland. There are two important components to passing this course. First, you will demonstrate that you have increased your knowledge of Finno-Ugric poetry and its interpretation, mainly through the reading of the Kalevala. Second, you will better your skills in acquiring, processing and understanding culture represented in the poetry. On this basis, by the end of the course you will 1) Be familiar with the content and the significance of the Kalevala and to some extent the Kalevipoeg and Päiven Párne, the epics of the Sami and the Estonian people. 2) Be able to thoughtfully and critically discuss and write about these works in their historical and comparative context based on the reading you have gotten familiar with during the course.

Nestingen, Andrew
TTh 1230-220
SAV 136

SCAND 367 Sexuality in Scandinavia: Myth and Reality (5)
Examines selected Scandinavian literary and socio-political texts, films, and art to manifest the reality behind the myths of sexual freedom in Scandinavia.

Dubois, Ia
TTh 130-320
GWN 301

SCAND 370 Vikings (5)
See HSTAM 370 for course description. Offered jointly with History.

Leiren, Terje
MTWTh130-220
SIG 134

SCAND 380 History of Scandinavia to 1720 (5)
Offered jointly with HSTEU 380. Please see HSTEU 380 for course description.

Leiren, Terje
MTWTh 1030-1120
TBA

SCAND 518 Foreign Language Teaching Methodology (2)
See NEAR E 518 for course description. Offered jointly with NELC and SLAV L & L.

Brandl, Klaus
Th 130-320
DEN 316

SCAND 519 Modern Scandinavian Politics (5)
Offered jointly with POL S 519. Please see POL S 519 for course description.

Ingebritsen, Christine
TTh 1230-220
SAV 158
LAW B 556 Islamic Law (3)
See Near E 524 for course description. Offered jointly with Near Eastern Languages and Civilization.

Lombardi, Clark
TTh 830-1020
LAW L201

LAW B 596 International Protection of Human Rights (4)
Offered as a lecture course (not a seminar course.) Contact Law Dept. or instructor for course description.

TBA
MW 130-320
LAW 116
SLAV 223 A Cinema of Roman Polanski (5)
See C LIT 397 B for course description. Offered jointly with Comparative Literature 397 B.
Crnkovic, Gordana
TTh 230-420
MUE 153

SLAV 425 Ways of Meaning: Universal and Culture Specific Aspects of Language (5)
Social and cultural conditioning of language use. Language as a mirror of culture and national character. Universal and culture/language specific components in linguistic expression of emotions, courtesy/politeness and rudeness, prejudice and (in)sensitivities, linguistic expression of gender differences in different cultures. The language you speak matters. It is like other languages in many respects, but unique in others. Learning the Natural Semantic Meta-language and how to capture similarities and differences in meaning cross-linguistically.Languages and Literatures office. Prerequisite: permission of instructor and undergraduate adviser.

Dziwirek, Katarzyna
MW 1230-220
SMI 102

SLAV 518 Foreign Language Teaching Methodology (2)
See NEAR E 518 for course description. Offered jointly with NELC and Scandinavian Studies.

Brandl, Klaus
Th 130-320
DEN 316

POLSH 320 Polish Culture (5)
History of Poland from its beginning to the present. The medieval Polish
Kingdom, growth and decline of the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth. The
phenomenon of noble democracy, religious tolerance. Partitions, 19th century
uprisings. Poland in the 20th century: regaining independence, interwar
period, the Second World War and Soviet domination 1945-1989. Post communist
Poland. Offered jointly with HSTEU 490 A. Please see HSTEU 490 A for course description.

TBA
MW 230-420
JHN 175

RUSS 110 A Introduction to Russian Culture and Civilization (5)
See JSIS A 110 for course description. Offered jointly with International Studies.

Henry, Barbara
MTWTh 1230-120
PCAR 290

RUSS 420 Russian food (5)
Offered jointly with CHID 498 and RUSS 520. See CHID 498 for course description.

Alaniz, Jose
TTh 930-1120
TBA

RUSS 423 A Disability in Russian Cinema (5)
Offered jointly with C LIT 497. See C LIT 497 for course description.

Alaniz, Jose
MW 930-1120
DEN 206

RUSS 426 A Russian Art and Architecture (5)

West, James
TTh 1230-220
CDH 135

RUSS 520 Russian food (5)
Offered jointly with CHID 498 and RUSS 420. See CHID 498 for course description.

Alaniz, Jose
TTh 930-1120
TBA

UKR 420 Literature, Film, and Culture of Ukraine (5)
Representative prose works by leading Ukrainian authors. Shows originality of Ukrainian literature through acquaintance with the peculiar historical and political situation of Ukraine. Offered in English. W option.

Rewakowicz, Maria
MW 230-420
PAR 212

Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations

PRSAN 411 Elementary Persian (5)

TBA
MTWThF 930-1020
SAV 130

PRSAN 421 Intermediate Persian (5)
Reading of simple texts with emphasis on reading and writing, conversation skills, grammar, and syntax. Builds a vocabulary of standard Persian in preparation for advanced reading and comprehension of literary texts. Prerequisite: PRSAN 413. Native speakers are not allowed to enroll in course.

TBA
MTWThF 1130-1220
SAV 139

PRSAN 490 Supervised Study in Persian (1-6)
Special work in literary texts for graduates and undergraduates. Prerequisite: PRSAN 423. Prior approval from professor required.

TBA
TBA
TBA

TKIC 417 Elementary Uygur (5)
Continuation of basic modern Uygur: phonological rules, grammar and vocabulary. Practice in reading, listening and oral comprehension. Prerequisite: TKIC 418 or equivalent or permission of instructor.

Mawkanuli, Talant
TWTh 1000-1120
SAV 167

TKIC 421 Intermediate Uzbek (3)
Please contact the instructor for course description.

Cirtautas, Ilse
TTh 200-350
PAR 305

TKIC 490 Supervised Study (1-6)
Special works in literary texts for graduates and undergraduates. Prerequisite: either TKIC 404, TKIC 405, or TKIC 423.

TBA
TBA
TBA

TKIC 496 A Intermediate Kazak (5)

Mawkanuli, Talant
TWTh 1130-1220
TBA

TKIC 496 B Uzbek Language, Practice, Use, & Application. (3)
Please contact the instructor for course description.

Cirtautas, Ilse
TTh 200-350
LOW 118

TKIC 499 Undergraduate Research (1-5)
For Turkic language and literature majors.

TBA
TBA
TBA

TKIC 596 Intermediate Kazak (5)
See TKIC 496 A for course description. Graduate students only.

Mawkanuli, Talant
TWTh 1130-1220
TBA

TKISH 411 Elementary Turkish (5)
Introduction to modern Turkish. Pronunciation and conversation, grammar and composition, graded reading. Latin characters used throughout. (Cannot be taken for credit if TKISH 401 is taken.) This class is the first in three to develop basic communication skills in Turkish language. During the Fall Quarter, students learn the basic units of sentence, and sentence structure. By the end of the quarter they will be able to introduce themselves and talk about their present states. Students read the grammatical information before coming to the class. In the class, communication will be mostly in Turkish. there will be sessions for questions in English.

Kuru, Selim
MTWThF 930-1020
SAV 137

TKISH 421 Intermediate Turkish (5)
Introduction to modern Turkish literature. Prerequisite: TKISH 413. Complex sentence patterns in Turkish are practiced. there will be unedited reading material from the internet. Students will be encouraged to develop projects to facilitate their spoken language skills in Turkish. Everyday drills and exercises. In class writing practice.

TBA
MTWThF 1030-1120
SAV 139

Scandinavian Studies

ESTO 101 Elementary Estonian (5)
Fundamentals of oral and written Estonian.

TBA
MTWThF 1030-1120
MGH 255

ESTO 201 Second Year Estonian (5)
Intensive practice in speaking, reading and writing. Functional review of grammar. First in a sequence of three. Recommended: ESTO 103.

TBA
MTWThF 1030-1120
MGH 282

ESTO 490 Supervised Reading in Estonian (1-5)
Readings in a selected area of Estonian language, culture, or society.

TBA
TBA
TBA

LATV 101 Elementary Latvian (5)
Fundamentals of oral and written Latvian.

Grinberga, Iveta
MTWThF 930-1020
DEN 309

LATV 490 Supervised Reading in Latvian (1-5)
Readings in a selected area of Latvian language, culture, or society.

TBA
TBA
TBA

LITH 101 Elementary Lithuanian (5)
Fundamentals of oral and written Lithuanian.

Valanciauskiene, Ausra
MTWThF 930-1020
SAV 169

LITH 201 Second Year Lithuanian (5)
Fundamentals of oral and written Lithuanian.

Valanciauskiene, Ausra
MTWThF 1030-1120
TBA

LITH 490 Supervised Reading in Lithuanian (1-10)
Readings in a selected area of Lithuanian language, culture, or society.

TBA
TBA
TBA

Slavic Languages and Literature

BCS 401 Elementary Bosnian/Croatian/Serbian (5)
Comprehensive introduction to spoken and written literary Bosnian, Croatian, and Serbian. Offered Autumn quarter annually.

Belic, Bojan
MTWThF 1130-1220
MEB 243

RUSS 101 First Year Russian (5)
Introduction to Russian. Emphasis on oral communication with limited vocabulary. Short readings and writing exercises. Basic grammar. Conducted mostly in Russian. Offered Autumn quarter annually.

Zaitseva, Valentina
MTWThF 930-1020
FSH 108
TBA
MTWThF 1030-1120
TBA
Augerot, James
MTWThF 1130-1220
CLK 219
Belic, Bojan
MTWThF 1230-120
MEB 237

RUSS 201 Second Year Russian (5)
Comprehensive review of Russian grammar with continuing oral practice and elementary composition. Conducted mostly in Russian. See credit note above. Prerequisite: either 2.0 in RUSS 103 or 2.0 in RUSS 150. Offered Autumn quarter annually.

Zaitseva, Valentina
MTWThF 1130-1220
FTR 106

RUSS 301 Third Year Russian (5)
Comprehensive review of Russian grammar with continuing oral practice and elementary composition. Conducted mostly in Russian. See credit note above. Prerequisite: either 2.0 in RUSS 103 or 2.0 in RUSS 150. Offered Autumn quarter annually.

Polack, Zoya
MTWThF 1130-1220
DEN 310

RUSS 301 Third Year Russian (5)
Extensive practice in spoken and written Russian based on a variety of prose readings. Intensive review and supplementation of strategic grammatical concepts. First in a sequence of three. Prerequisite: either 2.0 in RUSS 203 or 2.0 in RUSS 250. For entry code please contact department at slavicll@uw.edu. Offered Autumn quarter annually.

Polack, Zoya
MTWThF 1130-1220
DEN 310

RUSS 304 Reading and Translation in Russian (1)
Translation techniques with emphasis on development of vocabulary and reading skills. Primarily for Russian regional studies majors. Credit/no credit only. Prerequisite: Two years of Russian or permission of instructor.

West, James
W 1230-120
SAV 141

RUSS 401 Advanced Russian (5)
Class discussion, oral presentations, and composition, based on reading a variety of texts, both literary and non-literary. Advanced grammar. Translation one full course period per week. See credit note above. Prerequisite: either 2.0 in RUSS 303 or 2.0 in RUSS 350. Offered Autumn quarter annually.

Polack, Zoya
MTWThF 900-1020
PAA A212

RUSS 499 Independent Study – Russian (varies)

TBA
TBA
TBA

RUSS 501 Russian Language for Graduate Students (2)
Develops skills of particular use to graduate students. Emphasis on rapid assimilation of variety of written materials with sophisticated understanding and maximum retention of vocabulary, and ability to discuss in Russian the more theoretical and abstract kinds of material. Prerequisite: RUSS 403 or equivalent and graduate standing in Russian, East European, and Central Asian Studies.

Polack, Zoya
MTh 1030-1120
GLD 117

RUSS 600 Independent Study – Russian (varies)

TBA
TBA
TBA

SLAV 499 Independent Study (varies)
Individual study of topics to meet specific needs. By arrangement with the instructor and the Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures office. Prerequisite: permission of instructor and undergraduate adviser.

TBA
TBA
TBA

Spring 2014

The course list for Spring 2014 is available as a pdf file.

Summer 2014

Click on a department name to display the course offerings.
Click on the course name to register.
COM 322 Global Communication (5)
Introduction to the history, purpose, channels, content, technologies, policy, and regulation of international communications systems. Issues covered include disparities in media development between post-industrial and developing nations, imbalances in international news and information flow, and the emergence of global communications. Offered jointly with POL S 329.

TBA
MW 940-1150
SMI 102
C LIT 230 Introduction to Folklore Studies (5)
Folklore (stories, songs, beliefs, customs, folk craft and folk art) is a window into a group’s worldview. This course will survey the different genres of folklore and kinds of groups which maintain folklore traditions. A variety of theories and methods applied in folklore studies during the past two centuries will be introduced in readings and lectures.  Comprehensive overview of the field of folkloristics, focusing on verbal genres, customs, belief, and material culture. Particular attention to the issues of community, identity, and ethnicity. Offered jointly with SCAND 230.

Smidchens, Guntis
MWF 910-1120 and TTh 910-1120 (B term)
DEN 309 and DEN 211
HIST 215 Histroy of the Atomic Bomb (5)
This course is concerned with the development and use of nuclear weapons from the beginning of the twentieth century to the first substantive arms control efforts in the early 1960s. We will pay particular attention to World War II’s anglo-american Manhattan Project, including the history of the Hanford Engineering Works in eastern Washington, and to nuclear weapons projects in Nazi Germany, as well as to the Cold War arms race between the Soviet Union and the United States. We will discuss the relevance of this history for questions of arms control and nuclear threats in the post-Cold War world. The three main intellectual axes of the course are: the science and the symobolisms associated with nuclear technology (that is, the transformative power of the atom); the rise of air power in American military doctrines; discussions of ethics in the public sphere from the interwar period to the postwar period.

TBA
MTWThF 1240-250
MOR 225

 

HSTEU 445  20th Century Russia: The Rise and Fall of the Soviet Union (5)
In 1917, the world’s first experiment in creating a socialist society was launched in Russia. Seventy-four years later, in 1991, Soviet Communism collapsed. Although relatively short-lived, the Soviet experiment was the great utopian project of the twentieth century. Its significance, therefore, transcended Soviet borders. Its meaning was debated around the globe. For some, it was humankind’s ultimate hope; for others, its “totalitarian terror” was among humanity’s darkest nightmares. Now that the history of the Soviet Union is behind us, and we have access to more sources that once were secret, we can assess as never before the meaning of the Soviet socialist project. Indeed, we need to do so, for the challenges that the Soviet socialist project entailed, whether creating the just society, overcoming economic backwardness, or using politics to transform society and culture, are some of the challenges (and dilemmas) that face the world today. Offered jointly with JSIS A 445.

TBA
MTWThF 1240-250
MOR 225
JSIS 478 Energy Geopolitics in East Asia, Japan, China, South Korea, North Korea, and Russia (5)
Modern life would be impossible without oil. Not only does this one resource provide fuels for every mode of transport, it is the origin for an infinite universe of fundamental goods, from computers and clothes to fertilizer and medicine. At present, petroleum is the one fuel without any real alternatives and the most highly traded commodity on Earth. No modern military can exist without it; a shrinking number of nations possess it. The “haves” are largely in unstable regions, the “have nots” in advanced and emergent economies. For these reasons, there is no such thing as energy security apart from oil. Understanding the contemporary world requires a familiarity with the global petroleum system and its geopolitics.

Montgomery, Scott
TTh 330-540
THO 335

JSIS A 301 Europe Today (5)
A multi-disciplinary approach to contemporary Europe focusing on social, political, cultural, and economic change, with special reference to developments in the countries of the European Union, Scandinavia, and those in Eastern Europe in the post-Soviet era. This course will introduce students to the political, social and cultural challenges that Europe faces today. We will explore aspects of history, politics, social life and the humanities in order to grasp the exciting dynamics of this continent on its integration path. Relying on the expertise of University of Washington faculty from several disciplines, the course also wants to introduce different methods and approaches to studying Europe to you. Weekly guest lectures by invited faculty therefore are a core part of Euro 301. Moreover, with this multidisciplinary approach we would like to invite specialization in European Studies and encourage students to develop research topics for their senior thesis.

Ingebritsen, Christine
MTWThF 110-320 B term
THO 202
JSIS A 445 20th Century Russia: The Rise and Fall of the Soviet Union (5)
See HSTEU 445 for course description. Offered jointly with History.

Young, Glennys
MTWTh 1020-1230
MOR 230
NEAR E 211 Islam (5)
See JSIS B 211 (International Studies) for course description. Offered jointly with JSIS B 211.

TBA
WThF 1200-320
DEN 216

NEAR E 496 D The Middle East and Central Asia (5)
This course is an introduction to Comparative Muslim Societies in the Middle East and Central Asia from anthropological perspectives. It is an ethnographic survey course which examines the unity and diversity of Muslim communities in different locations. This course aims to acquaint students with the significant linguistic, cultural and political diversity of Muslim societies and help them develop an understanding of Islam as lived experience with a focus on the everyday lives of Muslims in these societies. We will focus on how Islam informs culture and creates social and spiritual meaning for individual Muslims and Muslim communities. We will identify and examine some of the shared “fundamentals” of the religion; the Muslims’ understanding of their faith; the relationship of Islam to the political, economic and social lives of individual Muslims and how Islam shapes people’s sense of identity. No prior knowledge of or exposure to Islam on the part of students is presumed. However, some background in the Middle East and Central Asian Muslim world would be helpful, but not essential. The course will consist of lectures, reading assignments, and class discussions. In addition, it will make extensive use of films and other visual media materials. Offered jointly with NEAR E 596 D.

Mawkanuli, Talant
TTh 940-100
DEN 216

<ahref=”http://www.washington.edu/students/timeschd/SUM2014/neareast.html#neare596″ target=_blank”>NEAR E 596 D. The Middle East and Central Asia (5)
Offered jointly with NEAR E 496 D. See NEAR E 496 D for course description.

Mawkanuli, Talant
TTh 940-100
DEN 216
TKISH 600 Independent Study or Research (1-10)
TBA
TBA
TBA

Languages

PRSAN 401 First Year Persian (15)
Intensive study of grammar with oral and written drills and reading of simple texts. Cannot be taken for credit if PRSAN 411-413 has been taken previously.

TBA
MTWThF 910-1230
TBA
POL S 203 Introduction to International Relations (5)
This course introduces students to the major theoretical approaches to international relations “Realism, Liberalism, and Marxism” and uses these approaches to address a variety of issues. For example, we will discuss the rise of the modern state system, the origins of WWI, the Cold War, the Gulf Wars, genocide in Rwanda, free trade, globalization, North-South relations, the environment, and human rights. Primary course objectives are to demonstrate how theory influences our explanations; to familiarize students with some important issues in international politics; and most important, to help students evaluate contemporary issues in international politics.

TBA
MTWTh 440-650 B term
JHN 022

POL S 204 Introduction to Comparative Politics (5)
In this course we will explore recent and historical trends in the political and economic development of seven countries in four world regions, paying particular attention to differences and similarities between these countries that might explain when and why countries democratize, or when and how countries enhance their economic productivity. In doing so, we will address both major substantive issues as well as important theoretical debates that have informed the study of comparative politics over the last several decades. Why have some countries become stable democracies while others have become authoritarian or even totalitarian regimes? Why are poverty and inequality such pervasive problems in some areas that were former European colonies, while in other areas developing countries have made great strides toward alleviating these problems? Does economic globalization improve or hinder the prospects for economic development and democratization around the globe? Upon finishing this course, students will be in a position to formulate answers to these questions and enter some of the central debates that motivates the study of comparative politics.

TBA
TTh 940-1150
SMI 211

POL S 326 Scandinavia in World Affairs (5)
This course examines the post-war foreign, economic, security and environmental policies of the Scandinavian countries. The readings focus on the central institutions, policies and values of Northern European states. Students are encouraged to compare and contrast how the Nordic states have responded to three important international challenges to these societies during the post-war period: the emergence of a bipolar security system; the deepening and widening of European integration; and a new era of multilateralism. The course combines prominent theoretical approaches in the political science literature with the contributions of area studies specialists. Previous coursework in political science is recommended, but not required. The 10-15 page research paper should compare and contrast the contemporary foreign policies of two Northern European states. Offered jointly with SCAND 326 A.

Ingebritsen, Christine
MTWThF 910-1120
SIG 226

POL S 329 Global Communication (5)
See COM 322 for course description. Offered jointly with Communications.

TBA
MW 940-1150
SMI 102

POL S 427 International Political Economy (5)
In this course, students will focus on the interaction of politics and economics at the international level. We will examine both the government influences on the market and the market influences on governance. Topics covered will include trade policy, monetary policy, international financial markets, North/South relations, competing models of development, and alleviation of global poverty. In addition, we will examine the international arms trade, human trafficking, terrorism and climate change.

TBA
MTWThF 1200-210 B term
AND 008
SCAND 230 Introduction to Folklore Studies (5)
See C LIT 230 for course description. Offered jointly with Comparative Literature 230.

Smidchens, Guntis
MWF 910-1120 and TTh 910-1120 (B term)
DEN 309 and DEN 211

SCAND 326 A Scandinavia in World Affairs (5)
See POL S 326 for course description. Offered jointly with POL S 326.

Ingebritsen, Christine
MTWThF 910-1120
SIG 226
SLAV 223 Russian and East European Cinema (5)
This course surveys the Czech cinema “new wave” of the 1960’s and traces its infulence into the present day. We will pay attention to the role 20th century history, and especially ’60s popular culture, has played in Czech film, as well as how directors employ humor and sex as a strategy of resistance, survival and celebration. Featured directors include Jiri Menzel, Milos Forman, Vera Chytilova, Vaclav Vorlicek, and Jan Sverak.

Alaniz, Jose
MTWTh 900-1130
WFS 201

SLAV 499 Independent Study (varies)
Individual study of topics to meet specific needs. By arrangement with the instructor and the Department of Slavic
Languages and Literatures office. Prerequisite: permission of instructor and undergraduate adviser.

TBA
TBA
TBA

Languages

RUSS 150 Intensive First Year Russian (15)
Covers material of 101, 102, 103 in one quarter. For entry code contact the Slavic Languages and Literatures Department at 206-543-6848 or slavicll@uw.edu.

Shakirova, Aslu
MTWThF 830-930, MTWThF 110-210 plus quiz section
EEB 042 & DEN 316
RUSS 450 Intensive Fouth Year Russian (15)
Covers material of 401, 402, 403 in one quarter. Meets three hours daily. Prerequisite: either 2.0 in RUSS 303 or 2.0 in RUSS 350.

Polack, Zoya
MTWThF 830-1150
SMI 109
RUSS 499 Independent Study – Russian

TBA
TBA
TBA

RUSS 600 -Independent Study/Rsch.

TBA
TBA
TBA